BAHAY NA BATO PARTS PDF

A hat and cane rack placed at the caida or the staircase landing. Batibot Chair A metal version of the cane bentwood chair. A status symbol were the calados designed with art nouveau patterns by famous sculptors of the time such as Emilio Alvero and Isabelo Tampingco. Most popular styles used are the Solomonic columns that spiral upward into a Gothic arch. Concha IMAGE Vincent Coscolluela Latticework panels that framed the translucent capiz shells used to completely shut windows at night or during a storm. Espejo Spanish word for mirror.

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A hat and cane rack placed at the caida or the staircase landing. Batibot Chair A metal version of the cane bentwood chair. A status symbol were the calados designed with art nouveau patterns by famous sculptors of the time such as Emilio Alvero and Isabelo Tampingco.

Most popular styles used are the Solomonic columns that spiral upward into a Gothic arch. Concha IMAGE Vincent Coscolluela Latticework panels that framed the translucent capiz shells used to completely shut windows at night or during a storm.

Espejo Spanish word for mirror. In building terms, these were transoms above windows to allow more daylight in. Transoms that have tracery patterns were called espejong calado. Gallinera A bench with a built-in chicken coop underneath. These were designed for tradesmen and tenant farmers who brought in fighting cocks while waiting for the master of the house.

Kulompyo A rocking chair, also called tumba-tumba or mercedoras. Lavadores or lavadera A freestanding washstand with a swinging mirror and basin. This was a standard bedroom accessory, along with the orinola.

Media aquas or tapangcos Metal window awnings or canopies decorated with tin cutouts. It is topped by a weather vane with the letter O for oeste, the Spanish word for west. Painadora A dresser with a mirror. The full-length mirror usually comes with two adjustable side mirrors and a marble top called the tremor. Paminggalan This food cabinet with slatted doors to keep leftover food properly aired also functions as a plate cabinet. Its legs stand on tin cans filled with water or petroleum to discourage insects from crawling towards the food.

They were originally used as counterweights of Spanish galleons. Persiana Jalousies on window panels that shield the house interior from the sun while letting air in. A free-standing persiana called biombos was used as divider between the dining room and the volada to conceal a servant pulling a cord to swing the cloth fan over the dining table called the punkah. Silla Peresoza A lounging chair that allow a sitter to stretch out his legs on the unusually long armrests.

It is wider than a lounging chair to accommodate stocky friars, hence its name. In a bahay na bato, this was sometimes used as storage of family jewels and jars of silver coins. Back then, tenants caught stealing were imprisoned by landlord in the silong. Teja de curva Clay roof tiles that were laid carefully on the roof of a bahay na bato.

A tile roof traditionally kept the bahay na bato cool.

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Here’s A Complete List Of The 46 Parts of A Filipino House

Check out the terms in our Filipino glossary below, learn about the Pinoy home, and a bit of its history, as well. A balcony or terrace on a flat roof. A traditional Filipino house on stilts made of indigenous materials such as bamboo, sawali, and thatched nipa. It has swing-out windows with a tukod to hold them in place, a high-pitched, airy roof, and is raised from the ground to protect its owners from animal attacks and floods. The usual style of home inhabited by the noble families during the Spanish colonial times. Its ground floor, which is usually empty of made as a garage for horse-drawn carriages, is made of stone walls, while the second floor is made of wood. The rear porch of a bahay kubo used for washing and other domestic duties.

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Bahay Na Bato

The Filipino colonial style Bahay na bato influence is very evident in the Rakuh building. It also houses the cuadra stable for the ns. For starters, the traditional rooms in a typical Filipino ancestral house from the 19th century consist of the caida receiving roomsala mayor main living roomcomedor dining roomoratorio prayer roomcuartos bedroomscocina kitchenand azotea an open balcony that served service kitchen. During the Second World War, many of these houses were destroyed by both the American and Japanese forces. This was a standard bedroom accessory, along with the orinola. Jalousies on window panels that shield the house interior from the sun while letting air in.

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List_ Parts of Bahay Na Bato _ Filipiniana 101

Etymology[ edit ] Though the Filipino term bahay na bato means "house of stone", these houses are not fully made up of stone; some are even dominated more by wooden materials, and some more modern ones use concrete materials. The name got applied to the architecture as generations pass by, because contrary to its predecessor bahay kubo, which are fully made of organic materials, it uses stone materials. The first buildings during the early years of Spanish occupation were of wood and bamboo, materials with which the pre-Hispanic indigenous Filipinos had been working expertly since early times known as bahay kubo later named by the Americans as "nipa hut". In its most basic form, the house consisted of four walls enclosing one or more rooms, with the whole structure raised above ground on stilts. Its resemblance to a cube earned its description in Spanish, cubo. Clusters of these wooden houses clearly were predisposed to fire.

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Pinoy Dictionary: Parts of a Filipino Home

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